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Title: Observational constraints of stellar collapse: Diagnostic probes of nature's extreme matter experiment

Supernovae are Nature's high-energy, high density laboratory experiments, reaching densities in excess of nuclear densities and temperatures above 10 MeV. Astronomers have built up a suite of diagnostics to study these supernovae. If we can utilize these diagnostics, and tie them together with a theoretical understanding of supernova physics, we can use these cosmic explosions to study the nature of matter at these extreme densities and temperatures. Capitalizing on these diagnostics will require understanding a wide range of additional physics. Here we review the diagnostics and the physics neeeded to use them to learn about the supernova engine, and ultimate nuclear physics.
Authors:
;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4]
  1. CCS Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)
  2. Space Radiation Lab, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  3. Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)
  4. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22253335
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Advances; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: (c) 2014 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; DENSITY; NUCLEAR MATTER; SUPERNOVAE