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Title: Surface dust wipes are the best predictors of blood leads in young children with elevated blood lead levels

Background: As part of the only national survey of lead in Australian children, which was undertaken in 1996, lead isotopic and lead concentration measurements were obtained from children from 24 dwellings whose blood lead levels were ≥15 µg/dL in an attempt to determine the source(s) of their elevated blood lead. Comparisons were made with data for six children with lower blood lead levels (<10 µg/dL). Methods: Thermal ionisation and isotope dilution mass spectrometry were used to determine high precision lead isotopic ratios ({sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb) and lead concentrations in blood, dust from floor wipes, soil, drinking water and paint (where available). Evaluation of associations between blood and the environmental samples was based on the analysis of individual cases, and Pearson correlations and multiple regression analyses based on the whole dataset. Results and discussion: The correlations showed an association for isotopic ratios in blood and wipes (r=0.52, 95% CI 0.19–0.74), blood and soil (r=0.33, 95% CI −0.05–0.62), and blood and paint (r=0.56, 95% CI 0.09–0.83). The regression analyses indicated that the only statistically significant relationship for blood isotopic ratios was with dust wipes (B=0.65, 95% CI 0.35–0.95); there were no significant associations for leadmore » concentrations in blood and environmental samples. There is a strong isotopic correlation of soils and house dust (r=0.53, 95% CI 0.20–0.75) indicative of a common source(s) for lead in soil and house dust. In contrast, as with the regression analyses, no such association is present for bulk lead concentrations (r=−0.003, 95% CI −0.37–0.36), the most common approach employed in source investigations. In evaluation of the isotopic results on a case by case basis, the strongest associations were for dust wipes and blood. -- Highlights: • Children with elevated blood lead ≥15 µg/dL compared with a group with <10 µg/dL. • High precision lead isotopic ratios in blood, house dust wipes, soil, water, paint. • Associations for isotopic measures of blood and dust, blood and soil, blood and paint. • Regressions gave significance for isotopic measures of blood/dust and dust/soil.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [2] ;  [4]
  1. Graduate School of the Environment, Macquarie University, North Ryde NSW 2109 (Australia)
  2. (Australia)
  3. Information and Statistics Group, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia)
  4. Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22246955
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Research; Journal Volume: 126; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BLOOD; CHILDREN; CONCENTRATION RATIO; DRINKING WATER; DUSTS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS; HOUSES; ISOTOPE RATIO; LEAD; LEAD 204; LEAD 206; LEAD 207; LEAD 208; PAINTS; REGRESSION ANALYSIS; SOILS