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Title: Effect of resistivity profile on current decay time of initial phase of current quench in neon-gas-puff inducing disruptions of JT-60U

According to an early work [Y. Shibata et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 025015 (2010)] on the behavior of the plasma current decay in the JT-60U disruptive discharges caused by the radiative collapse with a massive neon-gas-puff, the increase of the internal inductance mainly determined the current decay time of plasma current during the initial phase of current quench. To investigate what determines the increase of the internal inductance, we focus attention on the relationship between the electron temperature (or the resistivity) profile and the time evolution of the current density profile and carry out numerical calculations. As a result, we find the reason of the increase of the internal inductance: The current density profile at the start of the current quench is broader than an expected current density profile in the steady state, which is determined by the temperature (or resistivity) profile. The current density profile evolves into peaked one and the internal inductance is increasing.
Authors:
;  [1] ; ; ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5]
  1. Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)
  2. Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka 311-0193 (Japan)
  3. (Japan)
  4. Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871 (Japan)
  5. Ishikawa National College of Technology, Ishikawa 929-0392 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22218427
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: (c) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; CURRENT DENSITY; DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES; ELECTRIC CURRENTS; ELECTRON TEMPERATURE; INDUCTANCE; ION TEMPERATURE; JT-60U TOKAMAK; NEON; PLASMA; PLASMA CONFINEMENT; STEADY-STATE CONDITIONS