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Title: Shock formation processes due to interactions of two plasmas in a magnetic field and modified two-stream instabilities

The study of interactions of exploding and surrounding plasmas in an external magnetic field [K. Yamauchi and Y. Ohsawa, Phys. Plasmas 14, 053110 (2007)] is verified with two-dimensional (2D) electromagnetic particle simulations, for a case in which the initial velocity of the exploding plasma is perpendicular to the external magnetic field. The 2D simulations show essentially the same shock-formation processes as those in the previous one-dimensional simulation, including penetration of exploding ions into surrounding plasma, formation of a strong magnetic-field pulse due to deceleration of the exploding ions, ion reflection by the pulse, and subsequent splitting of the pulse into two magnetosonic pulses which then develop into forward and reverse shock waves. Furthermore, the 2D structure of electromagnetic fields in the region, where the exploding and surrounding ions overlap, is investigated with particular attention to the linear and nonlinear evolution of modified two-stream instabilities in the magnetic field that is being gradually compressed. The effects of these instabilities on ion reflection and on 2D magnetic fluctuations in the two generated pulses are also discussed.
Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22218417
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: (c) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; FLUCTUATIONS; IONS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; ONE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; PLASMA; PLASMA SIMULATION; PULSES; REFLECTION; SHOCK WAVES; TWO-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; TWO-STREAM INSTABILITY