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Title: Study of nanosecond laser-produced plasmas in atmosphere by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

We investigate the evolution of the species from both the target and the air, and the plasma parameter distribution of the nanosecond laser-produced plasmas in atmospheric air. The technique used is spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. It is argued that the N II from the air, which is distributed over a wider region than the target species in the early stages of the discharge, is primarily formed by the shock wave. The ionized species have a larger expansion velocity than the excited atoms in the first ∼100 ns, providing direct evidence for space-charge effects. The electron density decreases with the distance from the target surface in the early stages of the discharge, and both the electron density and the excited temperature variation in the axial direction are found to become insignificant at later stages.
Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 XianNing West Road, Xi'an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22218002
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: (c) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AIR; ATMOSPHERES; ATOMS; DISTRIBUTION; ELECTRON DENSITY; EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY; EVOLUTION; EXPANSION; LASER-PRODUCED PLASMA; LASERS; PLASMA DENSITY; PLASMA PRODUCTION; SHOCK WAVES; SPACE CHARGE; SURFACES