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Title: Study of the surface heterogeneity of topographic and electric nature by atomic force microscopy by the example of triglycine sulfate

Triglycine sulfate crystals with an ideal (010) cleavage plane are used as model objects to reveal problems in interpreting atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of surfaces with nonuniform charge distribution. Specific microrelief features of two types are found: lenslike formations with different contrast and rounded protrusions/valleys of different size but fixed height. An analysis of their evolution with a change in temperature and under an electric field and mechanical impacts has made it possible to separate relief elements from the crystal domain structure. The interpretation proposed is confirmed by the multimode AFM data. The specific features of the images of dynamic domains and aged domains (which cannot undergo polarization reversal) are studied. The domain-wall width found in the AFM measurements depends on the technique used and the specificity of probe-surface interaction; it varies from 9 to 2000 nm. The most reliable data on the domain-wall width in triglycine sulfate crystals are provided by piezoelectric force microscopy, according to which the wall width does not exceed 30 nm.
Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22210416
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Crystallography Reports; Journal Volume: 58; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Pleiades Publishing, Inc.; http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; CHARGE DISTRIBUTION; CRYSTALS; DOMAIN STRUCTURE; ELECTRIC FIELDS; INTERACTIONS; PIEZOELECTRICITY; POLARIZATION; PROBES; SPECIFICITY; SULFATES; SURFACES