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Title: A LYMAN BREAK GALAXY IN THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE GRISM SPECTROSCOPY

We present observations of a luminous galaxy at z = 6.573-the end of the reionization epoch-which has been spectroscopically confirmed twice. The first spectroscopic confirmation comes from slitless Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys grism spectra from the PEARS survey (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically), which show a dramatic continuum break in the spectrum at rest frame 1216 A. The second confirmation is done with Keck + DEIMOS. The continuum is not clearly detected with ground-based spectra, but high wavelength resolution enables the Ly{alpha} emission line profile to be determined. We compare the line profile to composite line profiles at z = 4.5. The Ly{alpha} line profile shows no signature of a damping wing attenuation, confirming that the intergalactic gas is ionized at z = 6.57. Spectra of Lyman breaks at yet higher redshifts will be possible using comparably deep observations with IR-sensitive grisms, even at redshifts where Ly{alpha} is too attenuated by the neutral intergalactic medium to be detectable using traditional spectroscopy from the ground.
Authors:
; ; ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ; ; ; ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] ;  [13] ;  [14] more »; « less
  1. School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)
  2. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)
  3. National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ (United States)
  4. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)
  5. University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  6. University of California, Riverside, CA (United States)
  7. Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA (United States)
  8. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)
  9. Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)
  10. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)
  11. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)
  12. Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)
  13. Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Muenchen (Germany)
  14. International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia, M468, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22140287
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 773; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ATTENUATION; CAMERAS; EMISSION; EVOLUTION; GALAXIES; PROBES; RED SHIFT; RESOLUTION; SPACE; SPACE VEHICLES; SPECTRA; SPECTROSCOPY; TELESCOPES; WAVELENGTHS