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Title: THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND EXPERIMENT (CIBER): A SOUNDING ROCKET PAYLOAD TO STUDY THE NEAR INFRARED EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT

The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) is a suite of four instruments designed to study the near infrared (IR) background light from above the Earth's atmosphere. The instrument package comprises two imaging telescopes designed to characterize spatial anisotropy in the extragalactic IR background caused by cosmological structure during the epoch of reionization, a low resolution spectrometer to measure the absolute spectrum of the extragalactic IR background, and a narrow band spectrometer optimized to measure the absolute brightness of the zodiacal light foreground. In this paper we describe the design and characterization of the CIBER payload. The detailed mechanical, cryogenic, and electrical design of the system are presented, including all system components common to the four instruments. We present the methods and equipment used to characterize the instruments before and after flight, and give a detailed description of CIBER's flight profile and configurations. CIBER is designed to be recoverable and has flown four times, with modifications to the payload having been informed by analysis of the first flight data. All four instruments performed to specifications during the subsequent flights, and the scientific data from these flights are currently being analyzed.
Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1] ; ; ; ; ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ; ;  [5] ;  [6] ; ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9]
  1. Department of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  2. Department of Space Astronomy and Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)
  3. Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)
  4. Center for Cosmology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)
  5. Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States)
  6. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)
  7. Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)
  8. Department of Physics, The University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)
  9. Instrument Development Group of Technical Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22136586
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal, Supplement Series; Journal Volume: 207; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ANISOTROPY; BRIGHTNESS; COSMIC DUST; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; INFRARED SPECTRA; RELICT RADIATION; RESOLUTION; ROCKETS; SPACE VEHICLES; SPECTROMETERS; TELESCOPES; ZODIACAL LIGHT