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Title: Reducing Blood-borne Exposure in Interventional Radiology: What the IR Should Know

Interventional radiologists are at risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens in their day-to-day practice. Percutaneous exposure from unsafe sharps handling, mucocutaneous exposure from body fluid splashes, and glove perforation from excessive wear can expose the radiologist to potentially infectious material. The increasing prevalence of blood-borne pathogens, including hepatitis B and C, and human immunodeficiency virus, puts nurses, residents, fellows, and interventional radiologists at risk for occupational exposure. This review outlines suggestions to establish a culture of safety in the interventional suite.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2]
  1. University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology (Canada)
  2. St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22121723
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 36; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BLOOD; HEALTH HAZARDS; HEPATITIS; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; PATHOGENS; PERFORATION; RADIOLOGY; SAFETY; VIRUSES