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Title: Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event andmore » 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor control and a low toxicity profile. Further investigation is warranted to identify the patients who benefit most from this treatment modality. The optimal combination with androgen deprivation should also be defined.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [1] ;  [5] ; ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [2] ; ;  [1] ;  [2] ; ;  [3] ;  [6] ;  [1] ;  [2]
  1. Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)
  2. (Italy)
  3. CyberKnife Center CDI, Milan (Italy)
  4. Radiotherapy Unit, Carlo Besta Neurological Institute Foundation, Milan (Italy)
  5. Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)
  6. Department of Urology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22056054
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 82; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANDROGENS; ANTIGENS; CHOLINE; LYMPH NODES; METASTASES; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; PROSTATE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; RECTUM; STABILIZATION; TOXICITY