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Title: A Nuclear Renaissance: The Role of Nuclear Power in Mitigating Climate Change

The U. N. Framework Convention on Climate Change calls for the stabilization of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at double the preindustrial atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. To achieve this goal, carbon emissions in 2050 must not exceed their current level, despite predictions of a dramatic increase in global electricity demand. The need to reduce GHG emissions and simultaneously provide for additional electricity demand has led to a renewed interest in the expansion of alternatives to fossil fuels--particularly renewable energy and nuclear power. As renewable energy sources are often constrained by the intermittency of natural energy forms, scale-ability concerns, cost and environmental barriers, many governments and even prominent environmentalist turn to nuclear energy as a source of clean, reliable base-load electricity. Described by some as a ''nuclear renaissance'', this trend of embracing nuclear power as a tool to mitigate climate change will dramatically influence the feasibility of emerging nuclear programs around the world.
Authors:
 [1]
  1. Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA and MonAme Scientific Research Center, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21513475
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1342; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 2. international Ulaanbaatar conference on nuclear physics and applications, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia), 26-30 Jul 2010; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.3583179; (c) 2011 American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; AIR POLLUTION; CARBON; CARBON DIOXIDE; CLIMATES; CLIMATIC CHANGE; ELECTRICITY; EMISSION; EXPANSION; FISSION; FORECASTING; FOSSIL FUELS; GREENHOUSE GASES; INTERFERENCE; NUCLEAR ENERGY; NUCLEAR POWER; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; STABILIZATION CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; ELEMENTS; ENERGY; ENERGY SOURCES; FUELS; NONMETALS; NUCLEAR REACTIONS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; POWER