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Title: FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND CARBONACEOUS SOLIDS IN GAS-PHASE CONDENSATION EXPERIMENTS

Carbonaceous grains represent a major component of cosmic dust. In order to understand their formation pathways, they have been prepared in the laboratory by gas-phase condensation reactions such as laser pyrolysis and laser ablation. Our studies demonstrate that the temperature in the condensation zone determines the formation pathway of carbonaceous particles. At temperatures lower than 1700 K, the condensation by-products are mainly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are also the precursors or building blocks for the condensing soot grains. The low-temperature condensates contain PAH mixtures that are mainly composed of volatile three to five ring systems. At condensation temperatures higher than 3500 K, fullerene-like carbon grains and fullerene compounds are formed. Fullerene fragments or complete fullerenes equip the nucleating particles. Fullerenes can be identified as soluble components. Consequently, condensation products in cool and hot astrophysical environments such as cool and hot asymptotic giant branch stars or Wolf-Rayet stars should be different and should have distinct spectral properties.
Authors:
; ;  [1] ; ;  [2]
  1. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)
  2. Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitaets-Sternwarte (AIU), Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Schillergaesschen 2-3, D-07745 Jena (Germany), E-mail: Cornelia.Jaeger@uni-jena.de
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21296191
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 696; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/696/1/706; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ABLATION; ASTROPHYSICS; COSMIC DUST; FULLERENES; LASERS; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; PYROLYSIS; WOLF-RAYET STARS