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Title: Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standardsmore » established as indicated.« less
Authors:
;  [1]
  1. West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Community Medicine
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21261721
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Preventive Medicine; Journal Volume: 49; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; PUBLIC HEALTH; COAL MINERS; HEART; DISEASES; DISEASE INCIDENCE; APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS; USA; COAL MINING; TOBACCO SMOKES; WATER POLLUTION; AIR POLLUTION; COAL PREPARATION