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Title: Evaluation of Polyurethane Nasolacrimal Duct Stents: In Vivo Studies in New Zealand Rabbits

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic and biological effects of different polyurethane nasolacrimal duct stents in an animal model. Fifteen polyurethane nasolacrimal duct stents (n = 5 mushroom-type stents, n = 5 newly designed S-shaped TearLeader stents without hydrophilic coating, and n = 5 S-shaped TearLeader stents with hydrophilic coating) were implanted in the nasolacrimal ducts of eight unaffected New Zealand rabbits. One nasolacrimal system served as control. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed at 1-, 2-, and 4-week intervals, then after a 3-month interval, after which the animals were euthanized. All stents were implanted without major periprocedural complications. The stents proved to be patent by the end of the procedure. During follow-up, all mushroom-type stents were occluded at 4 weeks. None of these stents opened to forced irrigation. Clinically, all rabbits demonstrated severe dacryocystitis. Three out of five TearLeader stents without hydrophilic coating were blocked at 4 weeks; one out of five was open to irrigation. Best results were observed in the stent group with hydrophilic coating. Follow-up dacryocystography demonstrated patent stents in nasolacrimal ducts of all animals after 4 weeks. In only one of five cases, the coated stent became partially occluded after 2more » months. These animals were free of clinical symptoms. After 3 months, at least three out of five stents still opened to forced irrigation and only one stent was completely blocked. Dislocation of the stents was not observed. Refinement of the stent surface and stent design improves the results of nasolacrimal duct stenting in this animal model. Implantation of hydrophilic-coated S-shaped stents is highly superior to conventional mushroom-type stents and noncoated stent types. Hydrophilic coating seems to prevent foreign-body reactions, resulting in maximized stent patency.« less
Authors:
; ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [3]
  1. University Hospital Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany)
  2. Clinics of the University of Bonn, Haus fuer Experimentelle Therapie (Germany)
  3. Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21091137
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 29; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1007/s00270-005-0232-8; Copyright (c) 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.; www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; DISLOCATIONS; DUCTS; EVALUATION; IN VIVO; MUSHROOMS; POLYURETHANES; RABBITS