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Title: Chronic arsenic exposure increases TGFalpha concentration in bladder urothelial cells of Mexican populations environmentally exposed to inorganic arsenic

Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a well-established carcinogen and human exposure has been associated with a variety of cancers including those of skin, lung, and bladder. High expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-{alpha}) has associated with local relapses in early stages of urinary bladder cancer. iAs exposures are at least in part determined by the rate of formation and composition of iAs metabolites (MAs{sup III}, MAs{sup V}, DMAs{sup III}, DMAs{sup V}). This study examines the relationship between TGF-{alpha} concentration in exfoliated bladder urothelial cells (BUC) separated from urine and urinary arsenic species in 72 resident women (18-51 years old) from areas exposed to different concentrations of iAs in drinking water (2-378 ppb) in central Mexico. Urinary arsenic species, including trivalent methylated metabolites were measured by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method. The concentration of TGF-{alpha} in BUC was measured using an ELISA assay. Results show a statistically significant positive correlation between TGF-{alpha} concentration in BUC and each of the six arsenic species present in urine. The multivariate linear regression analyses show that the increment of TGF-{alpha} levels in BUC was importantly associated with the presence of arsenic species after adjusting by age, and presence of urinary infection. People from areasmore » with high arsenic exposure had a significantly higher TGF-{alpha} concentration in BUC than people from areas of low arsenic exposure (128.8 vs. 64.4 pg/mg protein; p < 0.05). Notably, exfoliated cells isolated from individuals with skin lesions contained significantly greater amount of TGF-{alpha} than cells from individuals without skin lesions: 157.7 vs. 64.9 pg/mg protein (p = 0.003). These results suggest that TGF-{alpha} in exfoliated BUC may serve as a susceptibility marker of adverse health effects on epithelial tissue in arsenic-endemic areas.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6]
  1. Seccion de Toxicologia, Cinvestav-IPN, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, Col. Zacatenco, CP 07300, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)
  2. Environmental Immunology and Neurobiology Section, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)
  3. Salud en el Trabajo, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico DF (Mexico)
  4. Division de Dermatologia, Hospital General Dr. Manuel Gea Gonzalez, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)
  5. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Juarez del Estado de Durango, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico)
  6. Seccion de Toxicologia, Cinvestav-IPN, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, Col. Zacatenco, CP 07300, Mexico D.F. (Mexico), E-mail: ldelrazo@cinvestav.mx
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21077757
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 222; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2006.12.015; PII: S0041-008X(06)00489-3; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ARSENATES; ARSENIC; BLADDER; DRINKING WATER; ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY; GROWTH FACTORS; HYDRIDES; LUNGS; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS; NEOPLASMS; OXIDES; SKIN; URINE