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Title: Wastes as co-fuels: the policy framework for solid recovered fuel (SRF) in Europe, with UK implications

European Union (EU) member states are adopting the mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) of municipal solid waste (MSW) to comply with EU Landfill Directive (LD) targets on landfill diversion. We review the policy framework for MSW-derived solid recovered fuel (SRF), composed of paper, plastic, and textiles, in the energy-intensive industries. A comparatively high calorific value (15-18 MJ/kg) fuel, SRF has the potential to partially replace fossil fuel in energy-intensive industries, alongside MSW in dedicated combustion facilities. Attempts by the European standards organization (CEN) to classify fuel properties consider net calorific value (CV) and chlorine and mercury content. However, the particle size, moisture content, and fuel composition also require attention and future studies must address these parameters. We critically review the implications of using SRF as a co-fuel in thermal processes. A thermodynamic analysis provides insight into the technical and environmental feasibility of co-combusting SRF in coal-fired power plants and cement kilns. Results indicate the use of SRF as co-fuel can reduce global warming and acidification potential significantly. This policy analysis is of value to waste managers, policy specialists, regulators, and the waste management research community. 63 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.
Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom). Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20939472
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 140; Other Information: s.pollard@cranfield.ac.uk
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; COCOMBUSTION; MUNICIPAL WASTES; SOLID WASTES; COAL; KILNS; CEMENTS; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; CALORIFIC VALUE; WASTE PRODUCT UTILIZATION; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; EUROPEAN UNION; COPROCESSING; MITIGATION; CLIMATIC CHANGE; ACIDIFICATION; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; POLLUTION REGULATIONS; FUEL SUBSTITUTION; HEAVY METALS; UNITED KINGDOM; COMPLIANCE; THERMODYNAMIC MODEL; SANITARY LANDFILLS