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Title: New approaches to evaluating the genetic effects of the atomic bombs

In the aftermath of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki fifty years ago, one of the compelling biomedical questions that arose concerned the genetic effects of this exposure. More recently, revelations of the extent of industrial or accidental exposures in the former Soviet Union and charges that employment in the Sellafield Nuclear Reprocessing Plant in West Cumbria, England has resulted in a gene-mediated increase in children of plant employees have served to keep in the public mind the issue of the genetic risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. The study of the genetic effects of the atomic bombs has moved from the gross morphological level of congenital malformations to the examination of DNA. However, were the need for such genetic studies to arise in the foreseeable future, despite this impressive progress in DNA-oriented systems, the documentation of congenital defect, genetic disease and child survival would still be an essential component of any future study. Whatever the geneticists may think, the phenotypic well-being and survival of children are still the primary indicators on which the public, who ultimately supports these studies, will base its judgement of risk. 28 refs.
Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
186195
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: American Journal of Human Genetics; Journal Volume: 57; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: PBD: Dec 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; HUMAN POPULATIONS; GENETIC RADIATION EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; CONGENITAL MALFORMATIONS; HEREDITARY DISEASES; LEUKEMIA; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; PROGENY; PHENOTYPE; MORTALITY; GENES; GENE MUTATIONS; IONIZING RADIATIONS; DNA HYBRIDIZATION; ELECTROPHORESIS; SURVIVAL CURVES; A-BOMB SURVIVORS; RADIATION DOSES