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Title: Neuroscience and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a mass spectrometric method for quantifying rare isotopes. It has had great impact in geochronology and archaeology and is now being applied in biomedicine. AMS measures radioisotopes such as {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca, with zepto- or attomole sensitivity and high precision and throughput, enabling safe human pharmacokinetic studies involving: microgram doses, agents having low bioavailability, or toxicology studies where administered doses must be kept low (<1 {micro}g/kg). It is used to study long-term pharmacokinetics, to identify biomolecular interactions, to determine chronic and low-dose effects or molecular targets of neurotoxic substances, to quantify transport across the blood-brain barrier and to resolve molecular turnover rates in the human brain on the timescale of decades. We will here review how AMS is applied in neurotoxicology and neuroscience.
Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
15011576
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-205763
TRN: US0501333
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Mass Spectrometry; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 2
Research Org:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ACCELERATORS; ACCURACY; AGE ESTIMATION; ARCHAEOLOGY; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BRAIN; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; RADIOISOTOPES; SENSITIVITY; TARGETS; TRANSPORT