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Title: Plant Succession at the Edges of Two Abandoned Cultivated Fields on the Arid Lands Ecology Reserve

How vegetation recovers from disturbances is an important question for land managers. We examined 500 m2 plots to determine the progress made by native herbaceous plant species in colonizing the edges of abandoned cultivated fields at different elevations and microclimates, but with similar soils in a big sagebrush/bluebunch wheatgrass steppe. Alien species, especially cheatgrass and cereal rye, were the major competitors to the natives. The native species with best potential for restoring steppe habitats were sulphur lupine, hawksbeard, bottlebrush squirreltail, needle-and-thread grass, Sandberg's bluegrass, and several lomatiums.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1]
  1. (OFFICE OF FELLOWSHIP PROG)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
15002937
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-36611
EW02J1370; TRN: US200420%%182
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Northwest Science; Journal Volume: 76; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: PBD: 1 Dec 2002
Research Org:
Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US)
Sponsoring Org:
US Department of Energy (US)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ARID LANDS; CEREALS; DISTURBANCES; ECOLOGY; GRAMINEAE; MICROCLIMATES; PLANTS; RYE; SOILS