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This content will become publicly available on July 12, 2017

Title: While-you-wait proteins? Producing biomolecules at the point of need

Potency and specificity have made protein drugs, or biologics, popular for the pharmaceutical industry due to their unparalleled potency and specificity. Due to their temperature sensitivity, however, storage and distribution remain challenges. Furthermore, industrial scale production of biologics is not well matched to the needs of personalized medicine. To take full advantage of the potential of biologics, new methodologies for their synthesis and purification are required to produce them when and where they are needed most at the point of care. Cell-free protein synthesis possesses the requisite portability and versatility to meet these needs. Some recent innovations that lead to distributed production techniques, enhanced product yields, and custom modifications will enable the rapid, on-demand production of personalized medicines.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Bresden Center for Interdisciplinary Research; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Bresden Center for Interdisciplinary Research; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division and Center for Nanophase and Material Sciences
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1327609
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Expert Review of Proteomics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1478-9450
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Cell-free protein synthesis; microfluidics; personalized medicine