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Title: Reactive Transport Models with Geomechanics to Mitigate Risks of CO2 Utilization and Storage

Reactivity of carbon dioxide (CO2), rocks and brine is important in a number of practical situations in carbon dioxide sequestration. Injectivity of CO2 will be affected by near wellbore dissolution or precipitation. Natural fractures or faults containing specific minerals may reactivate leading to induced seismicity. In this project, we first examined if the reactions between CO2, brine and rocks affect the nature of the porous medium and properties including petrophysical properties in the timeframe of the injection operations. This was done by carrying out experiments at sequestration conditions (2000 psi for corefloods and 2400 psi for batch experiments, and 600°C) with three different types of rocks – sandstone, limestone and dolomite. Experiments were performed in batch mode and corefloods were conducted over a two-week period. Batch experiments were performed with samples of differing surface area to understand the impact of surface area on overall reaction rates. Toughreact, a reactive transport model was used to interpret and understand the experimental results. The role of iron in dissolution and precipitation reactions was observed to be significant. Iron containing minerals – siderite and ankerite dissolved resulting in changes in porosity and permeability. Corefloods and batch experiments revealed similar patterns. With the right cationicmore » balance, there is a possibility of precipitation of iron bearing carbonates. The results indicate that during injection operations mineralogical changes may lead to injectivity enhancements near the wellbore and petrophysical changes elsewhere in the system. Limestone and dolomite cores showed consistent dissolution at the entrance of the core. The dissolution led to formation of wormholes and interconnected dissolution zones. Results indicate that near wellbore dissolution in these rock-types may lead to rock failure. Micro-CT images of the cores before and after the experiments revealed that an initial high-permeability pathway facilitated the formation of wormholes. The peak cation concentrations and general trends were matched using Toughreact. Batch reactor modeling showed that the geometric factors obtained using powder data that related effective surface area to the BET surface area had to be reduced for fractured samples and cores. This indicates that the available surface area in consolidated samples is lower than that deduced from powder experiments. Field-scale modeling of reactive transport and geomechanics was developed in parallel at Idaho National Laboratory. The model is able to take into account complex chemistry, and consider interactions of natural fractures and faults. Poroelastic geomechanical considerations are also included in the model.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1261781
DOE Contract Number:
FE0009773
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Research Org:
Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES