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Title: Convective Radio Occultations Final Campaign Summary

Deep convective systems are destructive weather phenomena that annually cause many deaths and injuries as well as much damage, thereby accounting for major economic losses in several countries. The number and intensity of such phenomena have increased over the last decades in some areas of the globe. Damage is mostly caused by strong winds and heavy rain parameters that are strongly connected to the structure of the particular storm. Convection over land is usually stronger and deeper than over the ocean and some convective systems, known as supercells, also develop tornadoes through processes that remain mostly unclear. The intensity forecast and monitoring of convective systems is one of the major challenges for meteorology because in situ measurements during extreme events are too sparse or unreliable and most ongoing satellite missions do not provide suitable time/space coverage.
Authors:
 [1]
  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Washington, DC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1242988
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC--ARM-15-075
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-7601830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Publisher:
DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland, Washington
Research Org:
Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Washington, DC (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
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