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Title: Designing Biomimetic, Dissipative Material Systems

Throughout human history, new materials have been the foundation of transformative technologies: from bronze, paper, and ceramics to steel, silicon, and polymers, each material has enabled far-reaching advances. Today, another new class of materials is emerging—one with both the potential to provide radically new functions and to challenge our notion of what constitutes a “material”. These materials would harvest, transduce, or dissipate energy to perform autonomous, dynamic functions that mimic the behaviors of living organisms. Herein, we discuss the challenges and benefits of creating “dissipative” materials that can potentially blur the boundaries between living and non-living matter.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [1] ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] ;  [2]
  1. Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.
  2. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology
  3. Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology. Center for Micro-Engineered Materials
  4. UChicago, LLC., Argonne, IL (United States)
  5. New York Univ. (NYU), NY (United States). Dept. of Physics
  6. Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics
  7. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. Dept. of Macromolecular Science and Engineering Physics
  8. Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science
  9. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering and Biological Engineering
  10. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  11. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering. Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
  12. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Medicine. Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1235400
Report Number(s):
DOE-Pitt--0012348
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012348
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Research Org:
Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE