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Title: Sensing of molecules using quantum dynamics

In this study, we design sensors where information is transferred between the sensing event and the actuator via quantum relaxation processes, through distances of a few nanometers. We thus explore the possibility of sensing using intrinsically quantum mechanical phenomena that are also at play in photobiology, bioenergetics, and information processing. Specifically, we analyze schemes for sensing based on charge transfer and polarization (electronic relaxation) processes. These devices can have surprising properties. Their sensitivity can increase with increasing separation between the sites of sensing (the receptor) and the actuator (often a solid-state substrate). This counterintuitive response and other quantum features give these devices favorable characteristics, such as enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. Finally, using coherent phenomena at the core of molecular sensing presents technical challenges but also suggests appealing schemes for molecular sensing and information transfer in supramolecular structures.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3]
  1. Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  2. Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Chemical Physics
  3. Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Physics
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1235163
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0010662
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 112; Journal Issue: 19; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424
Publisher:
National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)
Research Org:
Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; molecular sensing; quantum relaxation processes; charge transfer; field-effect transistors; coherence