skip to main content

SciTech ConnectSciTech Connect

Title: Biomass Burning Observation Project Science Plan

Aerosols from biomass burning perturb Earth’s climate through the direct radiative effect (both scattering and absorption) and through influences on cloud formation and precipitation and the semi-direct effect. Despite much effort, quantities important to determining radiative forcing such as the mass absorption coefficients (MAC) of light-absorbing carbon, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation rates, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity remain in doubt. Field campaigns in northern temperate latitudes have been overwhelmingly devoted to other aerosol sources in spite of biomass burning producing about one-third of the fine particles (PM2.5) in the U.S.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1]
  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1233529
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC-ARM-13-014
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-7601830
Resource Type:
Program Document
Publisher:
DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland, Washington.
Research Org:
DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland, Washington.; Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English