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Title: 2015 Final Reports from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop

The two primary purposes of LANL’s Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop are (1) To educate graduate and exceptional undergraduate students in the challenges and applications of computational physics of interest to LANL, and (2) Entice their interest toward those challenges. Computational physics is emerging as a discipline in its own right, combining expertise in mathematics, physics, and computer science. The mathematical aspects focus on numerical methods for solving equations on the computer as well as developing test problems with analytical solutions. The physics aspects are very broad, ranging from low-temperature material modeling to extremely high temperature plasma physics, radiation transport and neutron transport. The computer science issues are concerned with matching numerical algorithms to emerging architectures and maintaining the quality of extremely large codes built to perform multi-physics calculations. Although graduate programs associated with computational physics are emerging, it is apparent that the pool of U.S. citizens in this multi-disciplinary field is relatively small and is typically not focused on the aspects that are of primary interest to LANL. Furthermore, more structured foundations for LANL interaction with universities in computational physics is needed; historically interactions rely heavily on individuals’ personalities and personal contacts. Thus a tertiary purpose of the Summermore » Workshop is to build an educational network of LANL researchers, university professors, and emerging students to advance the field and LANL’s involvement in it. This report includes both the background for the program and the reports from the students.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [1] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [1] ;  [11] ;  [12] ;  [13] ;  [1] ;  [1] more »;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [14] « less
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)
  4. Univ. of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States)
  5. Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)
  6. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES)
  7. Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  8. Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)
  9. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
  10. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)
  11. Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States)
  12. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)
  13. Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
  14. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1223752
Report Number(s):
LA-UR--15-28038
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Research Org:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 58 GEOSCIENCES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE