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Title: Cancer from internal emitters

Irradiation from internal emitters, or internally deposited radionuclides, is an important component of radiation exposures encountered in the workplace, home, or general environment. Long-term studies of human populations exposed to various internal emitters by different routes of exposure are producing critical information for the protection of workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to examine recent developments and discuss their potential importance for understanding lifetime cancer risks from internal emitters. The major populations of persons being studied for lifetime health effects from internally deposited radionuclides are well known: Lung cancer in underground miners who inhaled Rn progeny, liver cancer from persons injected with the Th-containing radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast, bone cancer from occupational or medical intakes of {sup 226}Ra or medical injections of {sup 224}Ra, and thyroid cancer from exposures to iodine radionuclides in the environment or for medical purposes.
Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
114025
Report Number(s):
CONF-9508176--2
ON: DE96000326; TRN: 95:023164
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-76EV01013
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 10. international congress of radiation research (ICRR), Wurzburg (Germany), 27 Aug - 1 Sep 1995; Other Information: PBD: [1995]
Research Org:
Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; INTERNAL IRRADIATION; CARCINOGENESIS; LUNGS; RADON; LIVER; SKELETON; RISK ASSESSMENT