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Title: MICROSCALE METABOLIC, REDOX AND ABIOTIC REACTIONS IN HANFORD 300 AREA SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS

The Hanford 300 Area is a unique site due to periodic hydrologic influence of river water resulting in changes in groundwater elevation and flow direction. This area is also highly subject to uranium remobilization, the source of which is currently believed to be the region at the base of the vadose zone that is subject to period saturation due to the changes in the water levels in the Columbia River. We found that microbial processes and redox and abiotic reactions which operate at the microscale were critical to understanding factors controlling the macroscopic fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The combined laboratory and field research showed how microscale conditions control uranium mobility and how biotic, abiotic and redox reactions relate to each other. Our findings extended the current knowledge to examine U(VI) reduction and immobilization using natural 300 Area communities as well as selected model organisms on redox-sensitive and redox-insensitive minerals. Using innovative techniques developed specifically to probe biogeochemical processes at the microscale, our research expanded our current understanding of the roles played by mineral surfaces, bacterial competition, and local biotic, abiotic and redox reaction rates on the reduction and immobilization of uranium.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [3]
  1. WSU
  2. JCVI
  3. PNNL
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1105046
Report Number(s):
08ER64560
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-08ER64560
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Research Org:
Washington State University
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE; USDOE SC Office of Biological and Environmental Research (SC-23)
Contributing Orgs:
PNNL JCVI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES uranium, immobilization, biofilm, mobility, reduction, electron transfer, microscale, hot spot.