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Title: Terrorism, Globalization, and Fear: Physics in the 21st Century

In the last half of the 20th century, the US emerged as a center for physics education and research. European science, which had all but relocated to the American continent after the war, rapidly returned to create a resurgent inventory of centers of excellence. Nonetheless, throughout the remainder of the century, students continued to flock to US Universities and labs - first from Europe and increasingly from Asia. But declining federal investments, enhanced global distribution of the research enterprise, and falling undergraduate enrollments worldwide have increased the viscosity of international scientific exchange. Terrorist attacks and alarms of espionage have produced policy proposals that may exacerbate this trend. Is this the end for American prominence in science?
Authors:
 [1]
  1. (American Physical Society)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1015632
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: Fermilab Colloquia, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batvia, Illinois (United States), presented on September 11, 2002
Research Org:
FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ATTITUDES; EDUCATION; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; GLOBALIZATION; PHYSICS; SABOTAGE