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Title: Disrupted Functional Connectivity with Dopaminergic Midbrain in Cocaine Abusers

Chronic cocaine use is associated with disrupted dopaminergic neurotransmission but how this disruption affects overall brain function (other than reward/motivation) is yet to be fully investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that cocaine addicted subjects will have disrupted functional connectivity between the midbrain (where dopamine neurons are located) and cortical and subcortical brain regions during the performance of a sustained attention task. We measured brain activation and functional connectivity with fMRI in 20 cocaine abusers and 20 matched controls. When compared to controls, cocaine abusers had lower positive functional connectivity of midbrain with thalamus, cerebellum, and rostral cingulate, and this was associated with decreased activation in thalamus and cerebellum and enhanced deactivation in rostral cingulate. These findings suggest that decreased functional connectivity of the midbrain interferes with the activation and deactivation signals associated with sustained attention in cocaine addicts.
Authors:
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Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1014310
Report Number(s):
BNL--93782-2010-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 1932-6203; R&D Project: MO-085; KP1503010; TRN: US201111%%263
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: PLoS One; Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 5
Research Org:
BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY (BNL)
Sponsoring Org:
DOE - OFFICE OF SCIENCE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; BRAIN; CEREBELLUM; COCAINE; DEACTIVATION; DOPAMINE; FUNCTIONALS; HYPOTHESIS; NERVE CELLS; PERFORMANCE; THALAMUS dopamineric; midbrain; cocaine