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Title: Integrated approach to trailer design for spent fuel casks

General Atomics (GA) is developing the GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel transportation systems. The scope of our contract includes spent fuel casks, legal weight trailers, and ancillary equipment. Recent structural failures of spent fuel trailers have focused attention on trailer design. As a major element of spent fuel transportation systems, the concerns address the adequacy of trailer performance requirements, structural design and analysis, and in-service inspection and maintenance procedures. In response to these concerns, GA has applied an integrated approach to the design of the GA-4 and GA-9 transportation systems. The objectives are to design reliable, high-integrity trailers and to demonstrate their performance by test. Once the design is complete, a prototype trailer will be fabricated and a performance test program conducted in accordance with a comprehensive test program. GA`s trailer test program will include both design and operations elements, and will be used to optimize the operations and maintenance plan. The results of this program will provide positive public and regulatory perception of trailer durability and will support the development of industry standards for both legal weight and overweight trailers for spent fuel applications. 2 figs.
Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
10102024
Report Number(s):
GA-A--19607; CONF-890207--8
ON: DE89007644
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-88ID12698
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Waste management `89: 15th international waste management symposium conference,Tucson, AZ (United States),26 Feb - 2 Mar 1989; Other Information: PBD: Feb 1989
Research Org:
General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; TRANSPORT; SPENT FUEL CASKS; DESIGN; TRAILERS; NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACTS; COMPLIANCE; PERFORMANCE TESTING; PLANNING 420204; SHIPPING CONTAINERS