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Title: Bob Wilson and The Birth of Fermilab

Abstract

In the 1960’s the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (then The Lawrence Radiation Laboratory) submitted two proposals to build the next high energy physics research laboratory. The first included a 200 GeV accelerator and associated experimental facilities. The cost was $350 million. The Bureau of the Budget rejected that proposal as a “budget buster”. It ruled that $250 million was the maximum that could be accepted. The second proposal was for a reduced scope laboratory that met the Bureau of the Budget’s cost limitation, but it was for a lower energy accelerator and somewhat smaller and fewer experimental facilities. The powerful Congressional Joint Committee on Atomic Energy rejected the reduced scope proposal as inadequate to provide physics results of sufficient interest to justify the cost. It was then that Bob Wilson came forth with a third proposal, coping with that “Catch 22” and leading to the creation of Fermilab. How he did it will be the subject of this colloquium.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
987262
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; FERMILAB; BOB WILSON; FUNDING PROPOSAL

Citation Formats

Goldwasser, Edwin L. Bob Wilson and The Birth of Fermilab. United States: N. p., 2009. Web.
Goldwasser, Edwin L. Bob Wilson and The Birth of Fermilab. United States.
Goldwasser, Edwin L. Wed . "Bob Wilson and The Birth of Fermilab". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/987262.
@article{osti_987262,
title = {Bob Wilson and The Birth of Fermilab},
author = {Goldwasser, Edwin L.},
abstractNote = {In the 1960’s the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (then The Lawrence Radiation Laboratory) submitted two proposals to build the next high energy physics research laboratory. The first included a 200 GeV accelerator and associated experimental facilities. The cost was $350 million. The Bureau of the Budget rejected that proposal as a “budget buster”. It ruled that $250 million was the maximum that could be accepted. The second proposal was for a reduced scope laboratory that met the Bureau of the Budget’s cost limitation, but it was for a lower energy accelerator and somewhat smaller and fewer experimental facilities. The powerful Congressional Joint Committee on Atomic Energy rejected the reduced scope proposal as inadequate to provide physics results of sufficient interest to justify the cost. It was then that Bob Wilson came forth with a third proposal, coping with that “Catch 22” and leading to the creation of Fermilab. How he did it will be the subject of this colloquium.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2009},
month = {9}
}

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