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Title: Women in Science: Fermilab computing analyst Margherita Vittone-Wiersma

Abstract

With February 11 marking the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, female physicists, engineers and computer scientists from CERN and Fermilab share their experiences of building careers in science. Margherita Vittone-Wiersma came to Fermilab as a physicist in February 1985. Together with a group of researchers from Italy's Institute of Nuclear Physics, she began a new experiment called E687. But she soon learned that she preferred working on data acquisition and the many methods to store and access the huge amount of data coming out of science experiments. What was once mere megabytes of data is now terabytes of information - and experimental physicists need to be able to retrieve stored data and monitor data coming from the detectors in real-time. "It's been an incredible change in scale of the amount of data that is handled by computers and has to be analyzed by the physicists," she says. Margherita migrated from physics to her new role in computing through lots of hands-on learning and classes in different programming languages and software development offered at Fermilab. She officially joined the lab's computing division in 1989. "It's a great experience to work with the physicists," she says. Together physicists andmore » computing experts iterate over tools "to make sure that everything is working the way they expect. It's very rewarding." Credits: Video production - Fermilab Creative Services Music Copyright: Universal Production Music Astral Light Chevalier Idea originally conceived by Tanya Levshina, Fermilab and Maria Dimou, CERN.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1646862
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; WOMEN IN SCIENCE; E687; DATA ACQUISITION; COMPUTER SCIENTIST

Citation Formats

Vittone-Wiersma, Margherita. Women in Science: Fermilab computing analyst Margherita Vittone-Wiersma. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Vittone-Wiersma, Margherita. Women in Science: Fermilab computing analyst Margherita Vittone-Wiersma. United States.
Vittone-Wiersma, Margherita. Wed . "Women in Science: Fermilab computing analyst Margherita Vittone-Wiersma". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1646862.
@article{osti_1646862,
title = {Women in Science: Fermilab computing analyst Margherita Vittone-Wiersma},
author = {Vittone-Wiersma, Margherita},
abstractNote = {With February 11 marking the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, female physicists, engineers and computer scientists from CERN and Fermilab share their experiences of building careers in science. Margherita Vittone-Wiersma came to Fermilab as a physicist in February 1985. Together with a group of researchers from Italy's Institute of Nuclear Physics, she began a new experiment called E687. But she soon learned that she preferred working on data acquisition and the many methods to store and access the huge amount of data coming out of science experiments. What was once mere megabytes of data is now terabytes of information - and experimental physicists need to be able to retrieve stored data and monitor data coming from the detectors in real-time. "It's been an incredible change in scale of the amount of data that is handled by computers and has to be analyzed by the physicists," she says. Margherita migrated from physics to her new role in computing through lots of hands-on learning and classes in different programming languages and software development offered at Fermilab. She officially joined the lab's computing division in 1989. "It's a great experience to work with the physicists," she says. Together physicists and computing experts iterate over tools "to make sure that everything is working the way they expect. It's very rewarding." Credits: Video production - Fermilab Creative Services Music Copyright: Universal Production Music Astral Light Chevalier Idea originally conceived by Tanya Levshina, Fermilab and Maria Dimou, CERN.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}

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