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Title: S&TR Preview: Smashing Materials to Reveal Unusual Behavior

Abstract

Squeeze a material hard enough, and its structure and properties will change, sometimes dramatically so. With enough heat and pressure, scientists can turn pencil lead (graphite), one of Earth’s softest materials, into diamond, one of its hardest. Apply even more pressure—such as might be found in explosions, detonating nuclear weapons, laser fusion experiments, meteorite impacts, or the hearts of stars and planets—and materials can take stranger forms. Deep in Jupiter’s core, for instance, where pressures likely reach 50 to 100 million times that of Earth’s atmosphere, hydrogen is predicted to be a metallic liquid rather than the familiar transparent gas.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1328749
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; SHOCK PHYSICS; MATTER; FUSION IGNITION; DYNAMIC COMPRESSION EXPERIMENTS

Citation Formats

Hunsberger, Maren, Akin, Minta, and Chau, Ricky. S&TR Preview: Smashing Materials to Reveal Unusual Behavior. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Hunsberger, Maren, Akin, Minta, & Chau, Ricky. S&TR Preview: Smashing Materials to Reveal Unusual Behavior. United States.
Hunsberger, Maren, Akin, Minta, and Chau, Ricky. Wed . "S&TR Preview: Smashing Materials to Reveal Unusual Behavior". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1328749.
@article{osti_1328749,
title = {S&TR Preview: Smashing Materials to Reveal Unusual Behavior},
author = {Hunsberger, Maren and Akin, Minta and Chau, Ricky},
abstractNote = {Squeeze a material hard enough, and its structure and properties will change, sometimes dramatically so. With enough heat and pressure, scientists can turn pencil lead (graphite), one of Earth’s softest materials, into diamond, one of its hardest. Apply even more pressure—such as might be found in explosions, detonating nuclear weapons, laser fusion experiments, meteorite impacts, or the hearts of stars and planets—and materials can take stranger forms. Deep in Jupiter’s core, for instance, where pressures likely reach 50 to 100 million times that of Earth’s atmosphere, hydrogen is predicted to be a metallic liquid rather than the familiar transparent gas.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {1}
}

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