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Title: 2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale

Abstract

A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1140196
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; DTEM; ELECTRON MICROSCOPE; ENGINEERING; BIOLOGY; NANOSCALE; MICROSTRUCTURE; TECH TRANSFER

Citation Formats

Lagrange, Thomas, and Reed, Bryan. 2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Lagrange, Thomas, & Reed, Bryan. 2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale. United States.
Lagrange, Thomas, and Reed, Bryan. Thu . "2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1140196.
@article{osti_1140196,
title = {2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale},
author = {Lagrange, Thomas and Reed, Bryan},
abstractNote = {A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2014},
month = {4}
}

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