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Title: SLAC All Access: Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

Abstract

Three hundred and fifty miles overhead, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope silently glides through space. From this serene vantage point, the satellite's instruments watch the fiercest processes in the universe unfold. Pulsars spin up to 700 times a second, sweeping powerful beams of gamma-ray light through the cosmos. The hyperactive cores of distant galaxies spew bright jets of plasma. Far beyond, something mysterious explodes with unfathomable power, sending energy waves crashing through the universe. Stanford professor and KIPAC member Roger W. Romani talks about this orbiting telescope, the most advanced ever to view the sky in gamma rays, a form of light at the highest end of the energy spectrum that's created in the hottest regions of the universe.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1134739
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; PHYSICS; COSMOLOGY; DARK MATTER; DARK ENERGY; BLACK HOLES; COSMOS; SATALITES, NASA

Citation Formats

Romani, Roger. SLAC All Access: Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Romani, Roger. SLAC All Access: Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. United States.
Romani, Roger. Fri . "SLAC All Access: Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1134739.
@article{osti_1134739,
title = {SLAC All Access: Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope},
author = {Romani, Roger},
abstractNote = {Three hundred and fifty miles overhead, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope silently glides through space. From this serene vantage point, the satellite's instruments watch the fiercest processes in the universe unfold. Pulsars spin up to 700 times a second, sweeping powerful beams of gamma-ray light through the cosmos. The hyperactive cores of distant galaxies spew bright jets of plasma. Far beyond, something mysterious explodes with unfathomable power, sending energy waves crashing through the universe. Stanford professor and KIPAC member Roger W. Romani talks about this orbiting telescope, the most advanced ever to view the sky in gamma rays, a form of light at the highest end of the energy spectrum that's created in the hottest regions of the universe.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2013},
month = {5}
}

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