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Title: Breakthrough: X-ray Laser Captures Atoms and Molecules in Action

Abstract

The Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC is the world's most powerful X-ray laser. Just two years after turning on in 2009, breakthrough science is emerging from the LCLS at a rapid pace. A recent experiment used the X-rays to create and probe a 2-million-degree piece of matter in a controlled way for the first time-a significant leap toward understanding the extreme conditions found in the hearts of stars and giant planets, and a finding which could further guide research into nuclear fusion, the mechanism that powers the sun. Upcoming experiments will investigate the fundamental, atomic-scale processes behind such phenomena as superconductivity and magnetism, as well as peering into the molecular workings of photosynthesis in plants.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States))
OSTI Identifier:
1131833
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; LCLS; LASER; X-RAY, LIGHT, MATERIAL SCIENCE; SLAC

Citation Formats

Bergmann, Uwe. Breakthrough: X-ray Laser Captures Atoms and Molecules in Action. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
Bergmann, Uwe. Breakthrough: X-ray Laser Captures Atoms and Molecules in Action. United States.
Bergmann, Uwe. Thu . "Breakthrough: X-ray Laser Captures Atoms and Molecules in Action". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1131833.
@article{osti_1131833,
title = {Breakthrough: X-ray Laser Captures Atoms and Molecules in Action},
author = {Bergmann, Uwe},
abstractNote = {The Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC is the world's most powerful X-ray laser. Just two years after turning on in 2009, breakthrough science is emerging from the LCLS at a rapid pace. A recent experiment used the X-rays to create and probe a 2-million-degree piece of matter in a controlled way for the first time-a significant leap toward understanding the extreme conditions found in the hearts of stars and giant planets, and a finding which could further guide research into nuclear fusion, the mechanism that powers the sun. Upcoming experiments will investigate the fundamental, atomic-scale processes behind such phenomena as superconductivity and magnetism, as well as peering into the molecular workings of photosynthesis in plants.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {4}
}

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