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Title: The Dark Universe Through Einstein's Lens

Abstract

Bard's talk explains the phenomenon known as gravitational lensing and how astrophysicists use it to explore the 95 percent of the universe that remains unseen: dark matter and dark energy. One of the most surprising predictions made by Einstein's theory of relativity is that light doesn't travel through the universe in a straight line. The gravitational field of massive objects will deflect the path of light traveling past, giving some very dramatic effects. We see multiple images of quasars, galaxies smeared into arcs and circles and magnified images of the most distant objects in the universe. This explains how gravitational lensing was first observed and discusses how scientists use this phenomenon to study everything from exoplanets to dark matter to the structure of the universe and the mysterious dark energy.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1108164
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: SLAC Public Lecture Series
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS

Citation Formats

Bard, Deborah. The Dark Universe Through Einstein's Lens. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Bard, Deborah. The Dark Universe Through Einstein's Lens. United States.
Bard, Deborah. Tue . "The Dark Universe Through Einstein's Lens". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1108164.
@article{osti_1108164,
title = {The Dark Universe Through Einstein's Lens},
author = {Bard, Deborah},
abstractNote = {Bard's talk explains the phenomenon known as gravitational lensing and how astrophysicists use it to explore the 95 percent of the universe that remains unseen: dark matter and dark energy. One of the most surprising predictions made by Einstein's theory of relativity is that light doesn't travel through the universe in a straight line. The gravitational field of massive objects will deflect the path of light traveling past, giving some very dramatic effects. We see multiple images of quasars, galaxies smeared into arcs and circles and magnified images of the most distant objects in the universe. This explains how gravitational lensing was first observed and discusses how scientists use this phenomenon to study everything from exoplanets to dark matter to the structure of the universe and the mysterious dark energy.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2013},
month = {7}
}

Multimedia:

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