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Title: Brittle Fracturing II

Abstract

These videos show the different ways in which interlaced nanoscopic grains of nickel break apart depending on whether or not certain impurities are present in the sample. A multidisciplinary team of physicists, chemists, materials scientists and computer scientists from Argonne National Laboratory, the University of Southern California (USC), Harvard University, Pennsylvania State University, and California State University at Northridge simulated the introduction of small amounts of sulfur into the boundaries between the nickel grains to investigate a material property known as "embrittlement". Seeing how different configurations of nickel function at these exceptionally small scales helps researchers understand the basic chemistry that will expedite the development of next-generation nuclear reactors. More: http://go.usa.gov/3ED

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); California State Univ., Northridge, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1045784
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ANL; NANOSCOPIC MATERIALS; NICKEL; EMBRITTLEMENT; IMPURITIES

Citation Formats

None. Brittle Fracturing II. United States: N. p., 2010. Web.
None. Brittle Fracturing II. United States.
None. Fri . "Brittle Fracturing II". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1045784.
@article{osti_1045784,
title = {Brittle Fracturing II},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {These videos show the different ways in which interlaced nanoscopic grains of nickel break apart depending on whether or not certain impurities are present in the sample. A multidisciplinary team of physicists, chemists, materials scientists and computer scientists from Argonne National Laboratory, the University of Southern California (USC), Harvard University, Pennsylvania State University, and California State University at Northridge simulated the introduction of small amounts of sulfur into the boundaries between the nickel grains to investigate a material property known as "embrittlement". Seeing how different configurations of nickel function at these exceptionally small scales helps researchers understand the basic chemistry that will expedite the development of next-generation nuclear reactors. More: http://go.usa.gov/3ED},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {1}
}

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