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Title: The Structural and Thermal Evolution of Transiting Exoplanets: From Hot Jupiters to Kepler's Super Earths

Large numbers of exoplanets can now be seen to transit their parent stars, which allows for measurements of their radii, masses, and densities. We can now begin to examine the Jupiter-class gas giantmore » planets as a class of astrophysical objects. At the same time, thanks to NASA’s Kepler telescope, the number of transiting planets below 10 Earth masses is now moving beyond just a handful. For the Jupiter-like planets, we model their interior structure and find several interesting properties regarding the amount of ice and rock within these planets, which gives us clues to their formation. For the lowest-mass planets, such as the 6-planet Kepler-11 system, signs point to a large populations of mini-Neptunes---low-mass, low-density planets with hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. The Kepler-11 system may tell us much about the evaporation of the atmospheres of these kinds of planets.« less
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Title: The Structural and Thermal Evolution of Transiting Exoplanets: From Hot Jupiters to Kepler's Super Earths
Authors:
Publication Date: 2011-06-11
OSTI Identifier: 1039026
DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type: Multimedia
Resource Relation: Conference: Fermilab Colloquia, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batvia, Illinois (United States), presented on June 15, 2011
Research Org: FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Subject: 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS
Country of Publication: United States
Language: English
Run Time: 0:01:07
System Entry Date: 2016-01-27