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Title: Understanding the Columbia Space Shuttle Accident

On February 1, 2003, the NASA space shuttle Columbia broke apart during re-entry over East Texas at an altitude of 200,000 feet and a velocity of approximately 12,000 mph. All aboard perished. Prof. Omore »sheroff was a member of the board that investigated the origins of this accident, both physical and organizational. In his talk he will describe how the board was able to determine with almost absolute certainty the physical cause of the accident. In addition, Prof. Osherhoff will discuss its organizational and cultural causes, which are rooted deep in the culture of the human spaceflight program. Why did NASA continue to fly the shuttle system despite the persistent failure of a vital sub-system that it should have known did indeed pose a safety risk on every flight? Finally, Prof. Osherhoff will touch on the future role humans are likely to play in the exploration of space.« less
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Title: Understanding the Columbia Space Shuttle Accident
Authors:
Publication Date: 2004-06-16
OSTI Identifier: 1016800
DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359
Other Number(s): TRN: US201207%%399
Resource Type: Multimedia
Resource Relation: Conference: Fermilab Colloquia, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batvia, Illinois (United States), presented on June 16, 2004
Research Org: FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Subject: 42 ENGINEERING ; ACCIDENTS ; ALTITUDE ; EXPLORATION ; NASA ; REENTRY ; SAFETY ; SPACE SHUTTLES ; VELOCITY
Country of Publication: United States
Language: English
Run Time: 1:29:18
System Entry Date: 2016-01-27