skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 4. The Neutrino

Abstract

Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". It's the most populous particle in the universe. Millions of these subatomic particles are passing through each one of us. With no charge and virtually no mass they can penetrate vast thicknesses of matter without any interaction - indeed the sun emits huge numbers that pass through earth at the speed of light. Neutrinos are similar to the more familiar electron, with one crucial difference: neutrinos do not carry electric charge. As a result they're extremely difficult to detect . But like HG Wells' invisible man they can give themselves away by bumping into things at high energy and detectors hidden in mines are exploiting this to observe these rare interactions.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1011910
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
CERN
Language:
English

Citation Formats

None. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 4. The Neutrino. CERN: N. p., 2009. Web.
None. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 4. The Neutrino. CERN.
None. Thu . "Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 4. The Neutrino". CERN. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1011910.
@article{osti_1011910,
title = {Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 4. The Neutrino},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". It's the most populous particle in the universe. Millions of these subatomic particles are passing through each one of us. With no charge and virtually no mass they can penetrate vast thicknesses of matter without any interaction - indeed the sun emits huge numbers that pass through earth at the speed of light. Neutrinos are similar to the more familiar electron, with one crucial difference: neutrinos do not carry electric charge. As a result they're extremely difficult to detect . But like HG Wells' invisible man they can give themselves away by bumping into things at high energy and detectors hidden in mines are exploiting this to observe these rare interactions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {CERN},
year = {2009},
month = {10}
}

Multimedia:

Save / Share:
Save to Playlist
You must Sign In or Create an Account in order to save documents to your library.