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Title: The Future of the Earth's Climate: Frontiers in Forecasting (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

Abstract

Summer Lecture Series 2007: Berkeley Lab's Bill Collins discusses how observations show that the Earth is warming at a rate unprecedented in recent history, and that human-induced changes in atmospheric chemistry are probably the main culprits. He suggests a need for better observations and understanding of the carbon and hydrological cycles.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
OSTI Identifier:
1009103
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: Summer Lecture Series, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States), presented on July 11, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY; CARBON; FORECASTING; CLIMATE CHANGE

Citation Formats

Collins, Bill. The Future of the Earth's Climate: Frontiers in Forecasting (LBNL Summer Lecture Series). United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Collins, Bill. The Future of the Earth's Climate: Frontiers in Forecasting (LBNL Summer Lecture Series). United States.
Collins, Bill. Wed . "The Future of the Earth's Climate: Frontiers in Forecasting (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1009103.
@article{osti_1009103,
title = {The Future of the Earth's Climate: Frontiers in Forecasting (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)},
author = {Collins, Bill},
abstractNote = {Summer Lecture Series 2007: Berkeley Lab's Bill Collins discusses how observations show that the Earth is warming at a rate unprecedented in recent history, and that human-induced changes in atmospheric chemistry are probably the main culprits. He suggests a need for better observations and understanding of the carbon and hydrological cycles.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2007},
month = {7}
}

Multimedia: