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Title: LCLS - The X-ray Laser Has Turned On

Abstract

On April 10, 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard x-ray free electron laser, was brought to lasing. Producing an x-ray beam with over a billion times higher peak brightness that then most powerful existing syncrotron sources, it marked the beginning of a new era of science. The LCLS pulses arrive at a rate of 60 - 120 Hz in an energy range from 480 eV to 10 keV, with pulse lengths as short as a few fs to about 300 fs. Since October 2009, users have been performing experiments at the LCLS, and currently three of the six planned instruments are available. Although we stand only at the beginning of LCLS science, there is no doubt about the strong sense of early excitement.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Linac Coherent Light Source
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
ANL (Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1007892
DOE Contract Number:
ACO2-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: APS Colloquium Series, Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States), presented on November 03, 2010
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; Video presentation

Citation Formats

Bergmann, Uwe. LCLS - The X-ray Laser Has Turned On. United States: N. p., 2010. Web.
Bergmann, Uwe. LCLS - The X-ray Laser Has Turned On. United States.
Bergmann, Uwe. Wed . "LCLS - The X-ray Laser Has Turned On". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1007892.
@article{osti_1007892,
title = {LCLS - The X-ray Laser Has Turned On},
author = {Bergmann, Uwe},
abstractNote = {On April 10, 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard x-ray free electron laser, was brought to lasing. Producing an x-ray beam with over a billion times higher peak brightness that then most powerful existing syncrotron sources, it marked the beginning of a new era of science. The LCLS pulses arrive at a rate of 60 - 120 Hz in an energy range from 480 eV to 10 keV, with pulse lengths as short as a few fs to about 300 fs. Since October 2009, users have been performing experiments at the LCLS, and currently three of the six planned instruments are available. Although we stand only at the beginning of LCLS science, there is no doubt about the strong sense of early excitement.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {11}
}

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