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Title: Self-Control in Cocaine Addiction (440th Brookhaven Lecture)

Abstract

A drug-addicted person may set a goal to abstain from taking drugs, yet soon afterwards he or she will ignore all warnings or reprimands, take an excessive amount of a drug, and possibly go much farther, such as trade in a car, or another valuable possession, for a couple of cocaine hits. This disadvantageous decision-making and drug- seeking behavior may continue despite catastrophic personal consequences -- for example, loss of job, health, or family -- even when the drug is no longer perceived as pleasurable. A series of brain-mapping studies and neuropsychological tests conducted at BNL has shown that people addicted to cocaine have an impaired ability to process rewards and exercise control, in a way that is directly linked to changes in the responsiveness in their prefrontal cortex, a part of the brain essential for advantageously monitoring and controlling one's own behavior. Goldstein will describe her research in this field, which was designed to test a theoretical model postulating that drug-addicted individuals disproportionately attribute value to their drug of choice -- at the expense of other potentially but no-longer-rewarding stimuli and at the same time, experience decreased ability to inhibit their drug use.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Ph.D., Medical Dept
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1005226
Report Number(s):
BNL-83215-2008-CP
TRN: US201117%%496
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: Brookhaven Lecture Series: 1960 - Present, Lecture presented at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States) on October 01, 2008
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; BNL; BRAIN; COCAINE; DECISION MAKING; MONITORING; STIMULI; DRUG ABUSE

Citation Formats

Goldstein, Rita. Self-Control in Cocaine Addiction (440th Brookhaven Lecture). United States: N. p., 2008. Web.
Goldstein, Rita. Self-Control in Cocaine Addiction (440th Brookhaven Lecture). United States.
Goldstein, Rita. Wed . "Self-Control in Cocaine Addiction (440th Brookhaven Lecture)". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1005226.
@article{osti_1005226,
title = {Self-Control in Cocaine Addiction (440th Brookhaven Lecture)},
author = {Goldstein, Rita},
abstractNote = {A drug-addicted person may set a goal to abstain from taking drugs, yet soon afterwards he or she will ignore all warnings or reprimands, take an excessive amount of a drug, and possibly go much farther, such as trade in a car, or another valuable possession, for a couple of cocaine hits. This disadvantageous decision-making and drug- seeking behavior may continue despite catastrophic personal consequences -- for example, loss of job, health, or family -- even when the drug is no longer perceived as pleasurable. A series of brain-mapping studies and neuropsychological tests conducted at BNL has shown that people addicted to cocaine have an impaired ability to process rewards and exercise control, in a way that is directly linked to changes in the responsiveness in their prefrontal cortex, a part of the brain essential for advantageously monitoring and controlling one's own behavior. Goldstein will describe her research in this field, which was designed to test a theoretical model postulating that drug-addicted individuals disproportionately attribute value to their drug of choice -- at the expense of other potentially but no-longer-rewarding stimuli and at the same time, experience decreased ability to inhibit their drug use.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {10}
}

Multimedia: