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Title: How Big Science Came to Long Island: The Birth of Brookhaven Laboratory (429th Brookhaven Lecture)

Abstract

Robert P. Crease, historian for the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and Chair of the Philosophy Department at Stony Brook University, will give two talks on the Laboratory's history on October 31 and December 12. Crease's October 31 talk, titled "How Big Science Came to Long Island: The Birth of Brookhaven Lab," will cover the founding of the Laboratory soon after World War II as a peacetime facility to construct and maintain basic research facilities, such as nuclear reactors and particle accelerators, that were too large for single institutions to build and operate. He will discuss the key figures involved in starting the Laboratory, including Nobel laureates I.I. Rabi and Norman Ramsey, as well as Donald Dexter Van Slyke, one of the most renowned medical researchers in American history. Crease also will focus on the many problems that had to be overcome in creating the Laboratory and designing its first big machines, as well as the evolving relations of the Laboratory with the surrounding Long Island community and news media. Throughout his talk, Crease will tell fascinating stories about Brookhaven's scientists and their research.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Philosophy
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1005214
Report Number(s):
BNL-83204-2007-CP
TRN: US1104095
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: Brookhaven Lecture Series: 1960 - Present, Upton, NY (United States), 31 Oct 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; ACCELERATORS; BNL; REACTORS

Citation Formats

Crease, Robert P. How Big Science Came to Long Island: The Birth of Brookhaven Laboratory (429th Brookhaven Lecture). United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Crease, Robert P. How Big Science Came to Long Island: The Birth of Brookhaven Laboratory (429th Brookhaven Lecture). United States.
Crease, Robert P. Wed . "How Big Science Came to Long Island: The Birth of Brookhaven Laboratory (429th Brookhaven Lecture)". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1005214.
@article{osti_1005214,
title = {How Big Science Came to Long Island: The Birth of Brookhaven Laboratory (429th Brookhaven Lecture)},
author = {Crease, Robert P.},
abstractNote = {Robert P. Crease, historian for the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and Chair of the Philosophy Department at Stony Brook University, will give two talks on the Laboratory's history on October 31 and December 12. Crease's October 31 talk, titled "How Big Science Came to Long Island: The Birth of Brookhaven Lab," will cover the founding of the Laboratory soon after World War II as a peacetime facility to construct and maintain basic research facilities, such as nuclear reactors and particle accelerators, that were too large for single institutions to build and operate. He will discuss the key figures involved in starting the Laboratory, including Nobel laureates I.I. Rabi and Norman Ramsey, as well as Donald Dexter Van Slyke, one of the most renowned medical researchers in American history. Crease also will focus on the many problems that had to be overcome in creating the Laboratory and designing its first big machines, as well as the evolving relations of the Laboratory with the surrounding Long Island community and news media. Throughout his talk, Crease will tell fascinating stories about Brookhaven's scientists and their research.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2007},
month = {10}
}

Multimedia: