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Title: Molecular gearing systems

Abstract

The race to create smaller devices is fueling much of the research in electronics. The competition has intensified with the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), in which miniaturization is already reaching the dimensional limits imposed by physics of current lithographic techniques. Also, in the realm of biochemistry, evidence is accumulating that certain enzyme complexes are capable of very sophisticated modes of motion. Complex synergistic biochemical complexes driven by sophisticated biomechanical processes are quite common. Their biochemical functions are based on the interplay of mechanical and chemical processes, including allosteric effects. In addition, the complexity of this interplay far exceeds that of typical chemical reactions. Understanding the behavior of artificial molecular devices as well as complex natural molecular biomechanical systems is difficult. Fortunately, the problem can be successfully resolved by direct molecular engineering of simple molecular systems that can mimic desired mechanical or electronic devices. These molecular systems are called technomimetics (the name is derived, by analogy, from biomimetics). Several classes of molecular systems that can mimic mechanical, electronic, or other features of macroscopic devices have been successfully synthesized by conventional chemical methods during the past two decades. In this article we discuss only one class of such model devices: molecularmore » gearing systems.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
968301
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
CHEMTECH
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: 11; Related Information: Copyright permission granted by ACS for posting of the full text in DOE's systems; Journal ID: ISSN 0009-2703
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; MOLECULES; GEARS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; MINIATURIZATION

Citation Formats

Gakh, Andrei A., Sachleben, Richard A., and Bryan, Jeff C. Molecular gearing systems. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Gakh, Andrei A., Sachleben, Richard A., & Bryan, Jeff C. Molecular gearing systems. United States.
Gakh, Andrei A., Sachleben, Richard A., and Bryan, Jeff C. Sat . "Molecular gearing systems". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/968301.
@article{osti_968301,
title = {Molecular gearing systems},
author = {Gakh, Andrei A. and Sachleben, Richard A. and Bryan, Jeff C.},
abstractNote = {The race to create smaller devices is fueling much of the research in electronics. The competition has intensified with the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), in which miniaturization is already reaching the dimensional limits imposed by physics of current lithographic techniques. Also, in the realm of biochemistry, evidence is accumulating that certain enzyme complexes are capable of very sophisticated modes of motion. Complex synergistic biochemical complexes driven by sophisticated biomechanical processes are quite common. Their biochemical functions are based on the interplay of mechanical and chemical processes, including allosteric effects. In addition, the complexity of this interplay far exceeds that of typical chemical reactions. Understanding the behavior of artificial molecular devices as well as complex natural molecular biomechanical systems is difficult. Fortunately, the problem can be successfully resolved by direct molecular engineering of simple molecular systems that can mimic desired mechanical or electronic devices. These molecular systems are called technomimetics (the name is derived, by analogy, from biomimetics). Several classes of molecular systems that can mimic mechanical, electronic, or other features of macroscopic devices have been successfully synthesized by conventional chemical methods during the past two decades. In this article we discuss only one class of such model devices: molecular gearing systems.},
doi = {},
journal = {CHEMTECH},
number = 11,
volume = 27,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {11}
}

Journal Article:
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