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Title: The movement ecology and dynamics of plant communities in fragmented landscapes

Abstract

A conceptual model of movement ecology has recently been advanced to explain all movement by considering the interaction of four elements: internal state, motion capacity, navigation capacities,and external factors. We modified this framework togenerate predictions for species richness dynamics of fragmented plant communities and tested them in experimental landscapes across a 7-year time series. We found that two external factors, dispersal vectors and habitat features, affected species colonization and recolonization in habitat fragments and their effects varied and depended on motion capacity. Bird-dispersed species richness showed connectivity effects that reached an asymptote over time, but no edge effects, whereas wind-dispersed species richness showed steadily accumulating edge and connectivity effects, with no indication of an asymptote. Unassisted species also showed increasing differences caused by connectivity over time,whereas edges had no effect. Our limited use of proxies for movement ecology (e.g., dispersal mode as a proxy for motion capacity) resulted in moderate predictive power for communities and, in some cases, highlighted the importance of a more complete understanding of movement ecology for predicting how landscape conservation actions affect plant community dynamics.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4]
  1. Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Biology
  2. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Zoology
  3. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Zoology
  4. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Biology
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH)
OSTI Identifier:
953634
Grant/Contract Number:  
AI09-00SR22188
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 105; Journal Issue: 49; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424
Publisher:
National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CAPACITY; COMMUNITIES; ECOLOGY; HABITAT; NAVIGATION; VECTORS; Corridors; dispersal; diversity; life-history traits; species richness

Citation Formats

Damschen, Ellen I., Brudvig, Lars A., Haddad, Nick M., Levey, Douglas J., Orrock, John L., and Tewksbury, Joshua J. The movement ecology and dynamics of plant communities in fragmented landscapes. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.0802037105.
Damschen, Ellen I., Brudvig, Lars A., Haddad, Nick M., Levey, Douglas J., Orrock, John L., & Tewksbury, Joshua J. The movement ecology and dynamics of plant communities in fragmented landscapes. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.0802037105.
Damschen, Ellen I., Brudvig, Lars A., Haddad, Nick M., Levey, Douglas J., Orrock, John L., and Tewksbury, Joshua J. Fri . "The movement ecology and dynamics of plant communities in fragmented landscapes". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.0802037105. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/953634.
@article{osti_953634,
title = {The movement ecology and dynamics of plant communities in fragmented landscapes},
author = {Damschen, Ellen I. and Brudvig, Lars A. and Haddad, Nick M. and Levey, Douglas J. and Orrock, John L. and Tewksbury, Joshua J.},
abstractNote = {A conceptual model of movement ecology has recently been advanced to explain all movement by considering the interaction of four elements: internal state, motion capacity, navigation capacities,and external factors. We modified this framework togenerate predictions for species richness dynamics of fragmented plant communities and tested them in experimental landscapes across a 7-year time series. We found that two external factors, dispersal vectors and habitat features, affected species colonization and recolonization in habitat fragments and their effects varied and depended on motion capacity. Bird-dispersed species richness showed connectivity effects that reached an asymptote over time, but no edge effects, whereas wind-dispersed species richness showed steadily accumulating edge and connectivity effects, with no indication of an asymptote. Unassisted species also showed increasing differences caused by connectivity over time,whereas edges had no effect. Our limited use of proxies for movement ecology (e.g., dispersal mode as a proxy for motion capacity) resulted in moderate predictive power for communities and, in some cases, highlighted the importance of a more complete understanding of movement ecology for predicting how landscape conservation actions affect plant community dynamics.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.0802037105},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 49,
volume = 105,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {12}
}

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