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Title: Evaluation of residual gas fraction estimation methods for cycle-to-cycle combustion variability analysis and modeling

Abstract

Cycle-to-cycle combustion variability in spark-ignition engines during normal operation is mainly caused by random perturbations of the in-cylinder conditions such as the flow velocity field, homogeneity of the air-fuel distribution, spark energy discharge, and turbulence intensity of the flame front. Such perturbations translate into the variability of the energy released observed at the end of the combustion process. During normal operating conditions, the cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV) of the energy release behaves as random uncorrelated noise. However, during diluted combustion, in either the form of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) or excess air (lean operation), the CCV tends to increase as dilution increases. Moreover, when the ignition limit is reached at high dilution levels, the combustion CCV is exacerbated by sporadic occurrences of incomplete combustion events, and the uncorrelation assumption no longer holds. The low or null energy released by partial burns and misfires has an impact on the following combustion event due to the residual gas that carries burned and unburned gases, which contributes to the deterministic coupling between engine cycles. Many residual gas fraction estimation methods, however, only address the nominal case where complete combustion occurs and combustion events are uncorrelated. Here we evaluate the efficacy of such methods onmore » capturing the effects of partial burns and misfires on the residual gas estimate for high-EGR operation. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed based on their ability to generate cycle-to-cycle estimates. Finally, a comparison between the different estimation techniques is presented based on their usefulness for control-oriented modeling.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Transportation Office. Vehicle Technologies Office
OSTI Identifier:
1756265
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Engine Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 0; Journal Issue: 0; Journal ID: ISSN 1468-0874
Publisher:
SAGE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; residual gas; estimation; cycle-to-cycle variability; control-oriented modeling; misfire limit

Citation Formats

Maldonado, Bryan P., and Kaul, Brian C.. Evaluation of residual gas fraction estimation methods for cycle-to-cycle combustion variability analysis and modeling. United States: N. p., 2021. Web. https://doi.org/10.1177/1468087420983087.
Maldonado, Bryan P., & Kaul, Brian C.. Evaluation of residual gas fraction estimation methods for cycle-to-cycle combustion variability analysis and modeling. United States. https://doi.org/10.1177/1468087420983087
Maldonado, Bryan P., and Kaul, Brian C.. Mon . "Evaluation of residual gas fraction estimation methods for cycle-to-cycle combustion variability analysis and modeling". United States. https://doi.org/10.1177/1468087420983087.
@article{osti_1756265,
title = {Evaluation of residual gas fraction estimation methods for cycle-to-cycle combustion variability analysis and modeling},
author = {Maldonado, Bryan P. and Kaul, Brian C.},
abstractNote = {Cycle-to-cycle combustion variability in spark-ignition engines during normal operation is mainly caused by random perturbations of the in-cylinder conditions such as the flow velocity field, homogeneity of the air-fuel distribution, spark energy discharge, and turbulence intensity of the flame front. Such perturbations translate into the variability of the energy released observed at the end of the combustion process. During normal operating conditions, the cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV) of the energy release behaves as random uncorrelated noise. However, during diluted combustion, in either the form of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) or excess air (lean operation), the CCV tends to increase as dilution increases. Moreover, when the ignition limit is reached at high dilution levels, the combustion CCV is exacerbated by sporadic occurrences of incomplete combustion events, and the uncorrelation assumption no longer holds. The low or null energy released by partial burns and misfires has an impact on the following combustion event due to the residual gas that carries burned and unburned gases, which contributes to the deterministic coupling between engine cycles. Many residual gas fraction estimation methods, however, only address the nominal case where complete combustion occurs and combustion events are uncorrelated. Here we evaluate the efficacy of such methods on capturing the effects of partial burns and misfires on the residual gas estimate for high-EGR operation. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed based on their ability to generate cycle-to-cycle estimates. Finally, a comparison between the different estimation techniques is presented based on their usefulness for control-oriented modeling.},
doi = {10.1177/1468087420983087},
journal = {International Journal of Engine Research},
number = 0,
volume = 0,
place = {United States},
year = {2021},
month = {1}
}

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