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Title: Psychological Distress and Alzheimer’s Disease Mortality in the United States: Results from the 1997–2014 National Health Interview Survey-National Death Index Record Linkage Study

Abstract

Objective: This study examines the association between psychological distress and Alzheimer’s disease mortality among US adults aged ≥45. Methods: We analyzed the Kessler 6-item psychological distress scale as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s mortality using the pooled 1997–2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)- National Death Index (NDI) database ( N = 265,089). Cox regression was used to model mortality as a function of psychological distress and sociodemographic and behavioral covariates. Results: The Alzheimer’s mortality risk was 97% higher (HR = 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.37, 2.84) in adults with serious psychological distress compared with those without psychological distress, controlling for sociodemographic covariates. The relative mortality risk remained statistically significant (HR = 1.49; 95% CI = 1.04, 2.13) after additional adjustment for smoking, alcohol consumption, health status, activity limitation, and body mass index. Discussion: US adults had significantly higher risks of Alzheimer’s disease mortality at higher psychological distress levels. These findings underscore the significance of addressing psychological well-being as a strategy for reducing Alzheimer’s disease mortality.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Office of Health Equity, Health Resources and Services Administration, Rockville, MD, USA
  2. Office of Health Equity, Health Resources and Services Administration, Rockville, MD, USA, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1731021
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Aging and Health
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of Aging and Health Journal Volume: 33 Journal Issue: 3-4; Journal ID: ISSN 0898-2643
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Singh, Gopal K., and Lee, Hyunjung. Psychological Distress and Alzheimer’s Disease Mortality in the United States: Results from the 1997–2014 National Health Interview Survey-National Death Index Record Linkage Study. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 2020. Web. https://doi.org/10.1177/0898264320977309.
Singh, Gopal K., & Lee, Hyunjung. Psychological Distress and Alzheimer’s Disease Mortality in the United States: Results from the 1997–2014 National Health Interview Survey-National Death Index Record Linkage Study. Country unknown/Code not available. https://doi.org/10.1177/0898264320977309
Singh, Gopal K., and Lee, Hyunjung. Fri . "Psychological Distress and Alzheimer’s Disease Mortality in the United States: Results from the 1997–2014 National Health Interview Survey-National Death Index Record Linkage Study". Country unknown/Code not available. https://doi.org/10.1177/0898264320977309.
@article{osti_1731021,
title = {Psychological Distress and Alzheimer’s Disease Mortality in the United States: Results from the 1997–2014 National Health Interview Survey-National Death Index Record Linkage Study},
author = {Singh, Gopal K. and Lee, Hyunjung},
abstractNote = {Objective: This study examines the association between psychological distress and Alzheimer’s disease mortality among US adults aged ≥45. Methods: We analyzed the Kessler 6-item psychological distress scale as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s mortality using the pooled 1997–2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)- National Death Index (NDI) database ( N = 265,089). Cox regression was used to model mortality as a function of psychological distress and sociodemographic and behavioral covariates. Results: The Alzheimer’s mortality risk was 97% higher (HR = 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.37, 2.84) in adults with serious psychological distress compared with those without psychological distress, controlling for sociodemographic covariates. The relative mortality risk remained statistically significant (HR = 1.49; 95% CI = 1.04, 2.13) after additional adjustment for smoking, alcohol consumption, health status, activity limitation, and body mass index. Discussion: US adults had significantly higher risks of Alzheimer’s disease mortality at higher psychological distress levels. These findings underscore the significance of addressing psychological well-being as a strategy for reducing Alzheimer’s disease mortality.},
doi = {10.1177/0898264320977309},
journal = {Journal of Aging and Health},
number = 3-4,
volume = 33,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = {2020},
month = {12}
}

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